Katoomba Town Centre will become a High Pedestrian Activity Area (HPAA), creating a safer environment for all road users, particularly pedestrians, cyclists and children.

The first stage of the HPAA upgrade work in Katoomba Town Centre include preparations for new street lighting at the pedestrian crossing on Parke Street (outside the Family Hotel). 

The existing street lights at this pedestrian crossing will be removed  so that new street lights can be installed when a new, raised crossing will also be constructed.

Katoomba Street, Bathurst Road and Parke Street will receive six separate traffic calming upgrades as part of the project, to support a reduced speed limit of 40km/hr, including:

  • Raising four existing pedestrian crossings 
  • Significantly upgrading the intersection at Parke Street and Waratah Street
  • Installing an additional speed hump on Katoomba Street at Davis Lane

Following the lighting work on Parke Street, the traffic calming upgrades will then take place in early February 2023 and are expected to be completed by the end of March 2023 (weather permitting).

Traffic and pedestrian management will be employed throughout the upgrade works, to ensure the safety of everyone. This will include some temporary fencing but this will not restrict access to pathways or local shops.

The six traffic calming upgrades will be constructed in a sequence to limit the disruption to pedestrians, motorists and businesses. A staging plan will be shared with the community before work commences.

View an overview of the Katoomba Town Centre HPAA works and locations.

Frequently asked questions


What is a HPAA?
HPAA stands for High Pedestrian Activity Area. These are areas of high pedestrian activity, near shopping strips, railway stations, bus interchanges, beach-sides and services such as medical centres. The maximum speed limit is 40km/h at all times. The different road environment helps to alert drivers to the lower speed limit and makes them aware of the presence of pedestrians moving about or near the road. This creates a safer road environment for all road users, particularly for pedestrians, cyclists and children.

Why is Council introducing a HPAA?
Blue Mountains City Council is strongly focused on pedestrian safety. We recognise that everyone is a pedestrian at some time and should be able to walk safely. 40 km/h High Pedestrian Activity areas are part of a strategy to reduce the number and severity of crashes. They have been introduced since 1991 as part of Local Area Traffic Management schemes.

Changing the way streets are used in town centres improves the quality of life. They become places for people, not just traffic.

What are the project outcomes?

  • Lower vehicle speeds.
  • Improved pedestrian facilities.
  • Improved pedestrian safety and amenity.
  • Improved movement and place amenity.
  • Safer road environment that supports pedestrian activity.
  • Statistically proven to reduce crashes.

Katoomba HPAA will not only improve road safety in the area, but also improve urban amenity and liveability
 

What work is going to take place? 
As part of the HPAA project, Katoomba Street, Bathurst Road and Parke Street will receive six separate traffic calming upgrades, to support a reduced speed limit of 40km/hr, including:

  • Raising four existing pedestrian crossings 
  • Significantly upgrading the intersection at Parke Street and Waratah Street
  • Installing an additional speed hump on Katoomba Street at Davis Lane
  • New street lighting at the pedestrian crossing on Parke Street (outside the Family Hotel)

View an overview of the Katoomba Town Centre HPAA works and locations.

Why is the speed limit being reduced?
Managing speed, in accordance with safe system principles, is a key component in managing pedestrian safety. Research and scientific analysis show that a pedestrian hit by a car travelling at 40 km/h has twice the chance of surviving the collision than if the car was travelling 50 km/h. Travelling speeds higher than 40 km/h greatly increases the risk of injury and death to pedestrians.

When will works be undertaken (Civil Works)?
Work is expected to occur during February - March 2023, weather permitting. Council is working with the construction contractor to identify the specific details - which will be shared with the community once finalised.

Traffic and pedestrian management will be employed throughout the upgrade works, to ensure the safety of everyone. This will include some temporary fencing but this will not restrict access to pathways or local shops.

The six traffic calming upgrades will be constructed in a sequence and at night to limit the disruption to pedestrians, motorists and businesses. A staging plan will be shared with the community before work commences.

Who is funding the project?
The project is fully funded by the NSW Government as part of the Transport for NSW Safer Roads Program. The Safer Roads Program is a road safety infrastructure treatment program that delivers sustainable and long-term reductions in road trauma through upgrades of the existing road network.

The program is a partnership between key Transport for NSW divisions and also works with local councils to install a range of safety treatments on existing roads across NSW.

Will the project introduce more pedestrian crossings?
No. There will be no change to the number or general location of pedestrian crossings.

Has heritage been considered as part of this project?
Yes. Heritage is considered with all BMCC projects.

There will be minor impacts to the streetscape through the construction. Heritage was a significant consideration during the design of the project and the design has carefully considered how to avoid impact on heritage items.