Blue Mountains City Council




 

Stopping the spread of weeds in the Blue Mountains

We can all work together to protect our World Heritage Area and the unique bushland, swamps and waterways of the Blue Mountains.

Your Council
Under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993, Blue Mountains City Council as the Local Control Authority, has a legal obligation to reduce the negative impact of weeds on the economy, community and environment.

These obligations are met through programs to:

  • control invasive weeds on public land; and
  • inspect private land to ensure that owners of land carry out their obligations to control noxious weeds, as imposed under the Act.

 

Council's Urban Weeds Team is responsible for implementing these programs. The programs are sub- catchment based, using a broad landscape weed control strategy. The Urban Weeds Team takes a coordinated approach with residents, community groups and other agencies to control noxious weeds on all lands in selected areas regardless of land tenure.

See the Blue Mountains City Council’s Weed Management Strategy.

What Is Our Aim?
Our aim is to: 

  1. Protect biodiversity by controlling invasive weeds and raising awareness of the impact of weeds on bushland, swamps and creek lines. This is achieved through communication between Council Officers and landholders, and through education about weeds and effective weed control techniques.
  2. Monitor the spread of invasive weeds and report new incursions within the Blue Mountains Local Government Area.

What is a Noxious Weed?
Some serious weeds are required by law to be controlled by all landholders in an area. These are known as noxious weeds and the law that controls these in NSW is the Noxious Weeds Act 1993.

Noxious Weeds can impact on human health, the economy, the liveability of our City and the environment. Impacts can include allergies and other health issues, costs of control, loss of tourism value, degradation of natural landscapes, parks and recreation facilities, reduction of useful agricultural land and loss of primary production, loss of biodiversity and water quality.

In New South Wales the administration of noxious weed control is the responsibility of the Minister for Primary Industries under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. The Act is implemented and enforced by the Local Control Authority (LCA) for the area, usually local government.


The Noxious Weeds Act 1993 specifies five control classes. Every declared noxious weed is placed within a class. The five classes and the specified action for each class are listed below:

Class 1: State Prohibited Weeds*
Class 1 noxious weeds are plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production or the environment and are not present in the State or are present only to limited extent.
The Noxious Weed Act 1993 requirement for a Class 1 noxious weed: “The plant must be eradicated from the land and that land must be kept free of the plant.”

 

The control objective for weed control Class 1 is to prevent the introduction and establishment of those plants in NSW.

Class 2: Regionally Prohibited Weeds*
Class 2 noxious weeds are plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production or the environment of a region but are not present in the region or are present only to limited extent.
The Noxious Weed Act 1993 requirement for a Class 2 noxious weed: “The plant must be eradicated from the land and the land must be kept free of the plant.”

The control objective for weed control Class 2 is to prevent the introduction and establishment of those plants in parts of NSW.

Class 3: Regionally Controlled Weeds
Class 3 noxious weeds are plants that pose a serious threat to primary production or the environment of an area and are not widely distributed in the area but are likely to spread in the area or to another area.

The Noxious Weed Act 1993 requirement for a Class 3 noxious weed: “The plant must be fully and continuously suppressed and destroyed and the plant must not be sold, propagated or knowingly distributed.”

The control objective for weed control Class 3 is to reduce the area and impact of those plants in
parts of NSW.

Class 4: Locally Controlled Weeds
Class 4 noxious weeds are plants that pose a serious threat to primary production, the environment or human health, are widely distributed in an area and are likely to spread in the area or to another area. The Noxious Weed Act 1993 requirement for a Class 4 noxious weed: “The growth of the plant must be managed in a manner that continuously inhibits the ability of the plant to spread".

Many listed Class 4 weeds have an extra requirement: "The plant must not be sold, propagated or knowingly distributed.”

The control objective for weed control Class 4 is to minimise the negative impact of those plants on the economy, community or environment of NSW.

Class 5: Restricted Weeds*
Class 5 noxious weeds are plants that are likely, by their sale or the sale of their seeds or movement within the State or area of the State, to spread in the State or outside the State.
The Noxious Weed Act 1993 requirement for a Class 5 noxious weed: “The requirements in the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 for a notifiable weed must be complied with."

The control objective for weed control class 5 is to prevent the introduction of those plants into NSW, the spread of those plants within NSW or from NSW to another jurisdiction. The aim is to prevent their sale, propagation and distribution.

* Class 1, 2 and 5 weeds are Notifiable Weeds under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993.

What is an Environmental Weed?
Environmental weeds are plants that invade our natural bushland, displace native plants and reduce biodiversity. Environmental weeds can have similar negative impacts to those described for noxious weeds. Although they are not listed declared noxious, Council invests significant resources in controlling these weeds to protect the City’s precious natural environment, to support community well-being, and our tourism economy.