Sustainable Landscaping Blue Mountains City Council
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Soil Character & Properties
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Landscape Design
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Establish and maintain
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Habitat and Biodiversity
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Water Management
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Erosion and Sediment Control
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Street Planting
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Interactive Plant Selection
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Establish and maintain

Climate, particularly frost and rainfall (both timing and amount), in combination with the character of the soil (native or modified) will largely dictate what can be readily grown on your site. It is best to use plants grown from local-provenance seed, as they will not mix genes from other areas into the local gene pool of the species.

Consider salvaging plant material from your site prior to the commencement of works. This material can be nursed until you are ready to transplant the material back onto the site. Propagate from seed collected on the site.

Remember that native plants are all plants from Australia. Indigenous plants are those specifically native to a particular place in Australia. Sustainable landscaping favours native and indigenous species but sometimes, for the purposes of growing food or providing seasonal shade, it is reasonable to use non-native vegetation. For instance, captured rainwater is used to irrigate deciduous plants that contribute directly to a building's passive solar performance.

Stock sizes
You may select plants that are: Tube stock - young plants, most frequently (but not exclusively) native species. These are believed to be preferable in rehabilitation work, and when planting out native gardens. Many indigenous species are only available in this sized container. These plants adapt to local conditions quickly, and moisture requirements following planting are relatively low. Less soil disturbance is inherent in planting out this type of material.

Long-stem tube stock - these are plants that have been intensively fed on a specific diet, but kept in small containers for a period of approximately 18 months. They are generally over 2 metres in height by that stage, and although sold in tubes, should not be root bound. These plants are ideally used during revegetation of creek lines and riverbanks, but may be planted out in other locations. They are usually only available from specialist growers.

Small pots - 4 inch or 100mm and 6 inch or 150mm pots. Sometimes referred to as "semi-advanced" plants. This is probably the most widely available range of plant material. Both exotic and native plants are sold in these sized containers.

Advanced trees - 8 inch or 200mm pots are over. Many exotic species, particularly fruit trees are available in these larger sizes. Only rarely are native plants available as "super advanced" specimens, although with increased demand, more varieties are likely to become available in the future. The larger the pot, the greater the effort required at both planting time and after care. If plants do not survive, then the financial loss is greater with larger specimens.




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