Sustainable Landscaping Blue Mountains City Council
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Home
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Soil Character & Properties
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Landscape Design
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Establish and maintain
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Habitat and Biodiversity
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Water Management
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Erosion and Sediment Control
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Street Planting
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Interactive Plant Selection
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Habitat and Biodiversity

The trees, rock outcrops and other vegetation are what make the natural environment unique. It is vitally important that their value is recognised. Provide habitats for native wildlife, such as rock terraces and crevices for lizards and ponds for frogs. Lizards, frogs and snails, as well as the native birds they in turn attract, will become part of your garden maintenance staff. They will assist you in keeping your garden pest free.

Don't allow this soil to be buried or turned over during construction. This is where the majority of indigenous plants store their surplus seed, (the seed "bank") and it is possible to encourage these plants to recolonise an area following site disturbance. Often, all that is required is basic weed control and perhaps the occasional water until plants establish.

It is important to reduce the importation of foreign soils, which may contain weed seeds or pathogens. Crushed sandstone is ideal for most areas, and its nutrient levels can be supplemented (if absolutely necessary) by the addition of composted organic matter (humus).

Avoid importing bushrock as the use of this material in landscaping is depriving bushland creatures of habitat and shelter.




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